Local News

San Diego Union-Tribune

  • Judge blocks Trump's favorite construction company from building private bord...
    December 6, 2019, 7:16 pm

    A federal judge in McAllen, Texas, has temporarily blocked a plan for a construction firm favored by President Trump to build a privately funded segment of border wall along the banks of the Rio Grande River.



  • Pearl Harbor veteran to be interred on sunken ship
    December 7, 2019, 1:47 pm

    With speeches and salutes, veterans and officials on Saturday commemorated the 78th anniversary of the 1941 sneak attack by Japan on Pearl Harbor, which brought a previously reluctant United States into World War II. A ceremony honoring survivors attended by US Interior Secretary David Bernhardt and Washington's ambassador to South Korea Harry Harris was held within sight of the sunken USS Arizona, which was bombed in the opening moments of the attack that killed more than 2,400 Americans. Later in the day, the remains of Lauren Bruner, who died in September at age 98 and was among the last sailors rescued from the Arizona after it exploded into flames, will be interred in the wreckage.



  • Chuck Todd Laces Into Ted Cruz for Saying Ukraine Meddled in 2016 Election
    December 8, 2019, 8:45 am

    A week after Meet the Press host Chuck Todd accused Sen. John Kennedy (R-LA) of pushing Russian propaganda on Ukraine, the NBC News anchor forcefully confronted GOP Sen. Ted Cruz over the Texas lawmaker?s belief that Ukraine meddled in the 2016 election.With the House of Representatives heading towards an impeachment vote, Cruz argued on Sunday that Democrats haven?t yet proven that the president violated any laws, insisting that Trump was just concerned about ?investigating corruption? when he pressured Ukraine to announce an investigation into former Vice President Joe Biden.?What I don?t understand is why do you believe that if an American is committing corruption we should have a foreign government to announce an investigation,? Todd wondered aloud. ?Is that appropriate or do you go to American authorities???So, I believe any president, any Justice Department has the authority to investigate corruption,? Crus responded. ?In this case, there was serious evidence on the face of corruption. The reason Hunter Biden got that position is because his daddy was vice president.?Fiona Hill Blasts GOP ?Alternate Narrative? on UkraineTodd, meanwhile, pressed forward and asked the conservative senator whether or not he believed that Ukraine meddled in the election?a talking point that has gained more traction among Republicans lately.?I do. And I think there is considerable evidence,? Cruz replied.?You do?? Todd shot back, expressing shock. ?You do?!?Earlier this fall, the intelligence community briefed senators and their aides that Russia has spent the past year attempting to frame Ukraine for Russia?s 2016 election interference. During an impeachment hearing last month, former White House Russia expert Fiona Hill also criticized Republicans for pushing a ?fictional narrative? on Ukraine meddling, adding that it likely came from a Russian disinformation campaign.Todd went on to remind Cruz about the president?s own smear campaign against him during the 2016 GOP presidential primary when they were both fighting for the Republican nomination.?Senator, this sort of strikes me as odd because you went through a primary campaign with this president,? the Meet the Press anchor noted. ?He launched a birtherism campaign against you. He went after your faith; he threatened to quote ?spill the beans? about your wife about something. He pushed a National Enquirer story, which we now know he had a real relationship with the editors.??I appreciate you dragging up all that garbage, that?s very kind of you,? Cruz snarked back.?Let me ask you this,? Todd continued. ?Is it not possible that this president is capable of creating a false narrative about somebody in order to help him politically??Cruz laughed off Todd?s questions, asserting ?that?s not what happened? and that the transcript of Trump?s July phone call with the Ukrainian president shows nothing wrong. He then claimed that while he does believe Russia interfered in the last election he doesn?t think that means Ukraine didn?t.The two would go back-and-forth over the evidence that the Ukraine government interfered in the election, with Cruz pointing to a 2016 op-ed by the Ukrainian ambassador criticizing Trump?s stance on Russian aggression against Ukraine as proof.?That?s the difference? What you are saying?you are saying a pickpocket, which essentially is a Hill op-ed, compared to Bernie Madoff and Vladimir Putin,? Todd snapped back. ?You are trying to equate?make them both seem equal. I don?t understand that.?Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.



  • How the Cool Kids of the Left Turned on Elizabeth Warren
    December 8, 2019, 5:04 am

    The socialists of Jacobin magazine used to treat her like a promising alternative to Bernie Sanders. Now they write as if she?s almost as bad as Joe Biden. What gives?



  • Polyamorous 20-year-old is dating 4 men while pregnant with her first child
    December 7, 2019, 8:18 am

    Tory Ojeda is a 20-year-old woman from Jacksonville, Fla., who is in a polyamorous relationship with four men. She is now expecting her first child with one of her partners. Ojeda told Barcroft Media that while the baby is biologically one of her partner's, the five of them plan on raising the child together as a family.



  • The 2 US Navy sailors being hailed as heroes in the Pensacola shooting were f...
    December 7, 2019, 8:36 pm

    Another victim from a previous shooting in Florida bore some semblance to the reported victims of the recent Naval Air Station shooting.



  • Body of slain doctor returns home to Japan from Afghanistan
    December 8, 2019, 2:26 am

    The body of a Japanese doctor killed in a roadside shooting in Afghanistan arrived back home Sunday, with government officials on hand to lead a brief ceremony of mourning at Tokyo's Narita International Airport. Tetsu Nakamura was killed last week, along with five Afghans who had been traveling with him. Keisuke Suzuki, Japan's state minister of foreign affairs, joined other officials in bowing their heads in prayer after laying flowers by the coffin, draped in white, in a solemn ceremony in honor of Nakamura at the airport.



  • New Jersey journalist re-arrested in Nigeria after brief glimpse of freedom
    December 7, 2019, 1:13 pm

    Omoyele Sowore, imprisoned in his home country of Nigeria since August, has been freed from government custody, but still has to stand trial.



  • TV reporter smacked on bottom during live broadcast: ?You violated, objectifi...
    December 8, 2019, 3:38 am

    A TV reporter said she was left ?violated? and ?embarrassed? after being smacked on the bottom during a live broadcast.Alex Bozarjian, of WSAV News, was reporting roadside from a 10km race in Savannah, Georgia, when a male participant ran up behind and struck her.



  • 5-Year-Old Carried a Toddler Through Minus 31-Degree Weather After Left Alone...
    December 8, 2019, 12:08 pm

    The children, who were dressed just in socks and light clothing, both received cold-related injuries



  • Indian border officials on lookout for fugitive cosmic guru
    December 7, 2019, 3:17 am

    Indian border officials and embassies have issued an alert for a fugitive guru accused of rape, the government said, days after the holy man announced the creation of his own "cosmic" country. Swami Nithyananda -- one of many self-styled Indian "godmen" with thousands of followers and a chequered past -- is wanted by police for alleged rape, sexual abuse, and abduction of children. Earlier this week, he announced online that he has created his own new country -- reportedly off Ecuador's coast -- complete with cabinet, golden passports, and even a department of homeland security.



  • Cory Booker: failure to engage black vote could hand White House to Trump
    December 8, 2019, 9:47 am

    * Democrat speaks to Guardian after Iowa campaign event * Debate needs candidate ?black and brown people can trust? * After Kamala: activists fear Democratic primary whitewash Cory Booker, the New Jersey senator struggling to be the only black candidate on the Democratic debate stage this month, has warned that the party could hand re-election to Donald Trump unless it sends a more positive message to African American voters.Booker has just four days left to meet stringent criteria set by the party for the next televised primary debate, in Los Angeles on 19 December. Should he fail to make the cut, the participants will be exclusively white, with more billionaires on stage than black people.In an interview with the Guardian, Booker said he was ?worried, very worried? that the party was heading towards a repeat of the 2016 election in which Trump snatched an unexpected victory partly because of the softness of the African American vote.About 4.4 million voters who voted for Barack Obama in 2012 stayed home in 2016. More than a third were black.?There would be a President Hillary Clinton right now if the African American turnout had been close to what it had been in 2012,? Booker said. ?That?s how real is the power and influence of the Democratic party?s most loyal voting base.?> We have to make sure there?s a candidate on that stage that black and brown people in this country can trust> > Cory BookerHe added: ?That?s why we have to make sure there?s a candidate on that stage that black and brown people in this country can trust, in whom they see their lived experience.?The issue of the fading diversity in the Democratic race has become a major talking point in the wake of the California senator Kamala Harris dropping out for lack of funds. With Harris out, the spotlight is increasingly falling to Booker. He has been quick to sound the alarm over the consequences of black voters feeling undervalued as election year approaches.Asked what message an all-white stage would send African Americans, he told the Guardian: ?The message is already being sent.?I?ve talked to civil rights leaders, Congressional Black Caucus members, you hear this being talked about now in the black community. People are saying there, ?This can?t be,? especially when there is a candidate out there who is fully qualified under any objective criteria other than the arbitrary polling system.?Booker has met the bar of 200,000 unique donors set by the Democratic National Committee (DNC) but is falling short of attaining 4% in four national or early state polls. Unless he can do that by Thursday he will not have a place at the debate.To rub salt into the wound, Tom Steyer, a billionaire hedge fund manager, has secured a position. Booker said the presence of billionaire candidates in the Democratic race ? Michael Bloomberg is the other ? was an insult to ?voters who wonder how you can have talented, qualified, experienced, proven diverse candidates that aren?t on the stage.?We?ve seen how you gin your poll numbers up by running nonstop ads ? that shouldn?t be the decider of who?s on stage at the debate, it sends a very bad signal.?The Guardian asked Steyer what he thought of the argument that the race was being distorted with billionaires buying prominence while diverse candidates languished.He said: ?I?m concerned about the diversity in the debates, too, and I have asked the DNC to change the criteria of the debates to get more diversity.?> It?s important we have a diverse group of people competing ? and I don?t think it?s fair, but I don?t run the process> > Tom SteyerSteyer has been able to use his personal wealth ? he is worth $1.6bn according to Forbes ? to vastly outspend Booker so far, buying $55m of TV and online ads to Booker?s $3m. The disparity is paradoxical given that one of Steyer?s main political platforms is combatting growing inequality.?A lot of people have complained to the DNC about how this is going,? Steyer said. ?It?s important that we have a diverse group of people competing for the nomination of the Democratic party and I don?t think it?s fair, but I don?t run the process.?The thorny question of billionaires using their financial muscle to wrestle themselves into the Democratic race has welled up again with the late entry of Bloomberg. The former New York mayor is outspending all the top-tier candidates combined, according to the Washington Post.It did not soothe the increasingly fractious mood when Bloomberg commented that Booker was ?well spoken?. He later apologised.Booker carved out his political reputation as mayor of Newark, New Jersey. He has a distinguished resume that includes having been a Rhodes scholar at Oxford, though he has complained that the media rarely point that out, unlike his Democratic rival Pete Buttigieg, also a Rhodes scholar.Booker said he was still confident he would make the debate later this month, joining those who have already been guaranteed a place: Buttigieg, Steyer, Joe Biden, Elizabeth Warren, Bernie Sanders and Amy Klobuchar.The decision of more than a million African American voters to stay home rather than vote in 2016 is widely considered an important factor behind Trump?s shock victory. Trump won the presidency comfortably in the electoral college yet in the key states of Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin he beat Clinton by only 77,000 votes.In the Wisconsin city of Milwaukee alone, Clinton attracted 70,000 fewer black votes than Obama in 2012.Booker said his anxieties about a potential repeat next November did not stop at the White House. He said low African American turnout could also have an effect on senatorial races in North and South Carolina, Georgia and Arizona that would prevent the Democrats taking back the Senate.?I?m very worried about consequences for the US Senate ? it?s not just Donald Trump,? Booker said. ?We cannot win in these very diverse states without not just good turnouts of African Americans ? we need Obama?s record turnouts again.?Booker was speaking at a Democratic presidential forum in Cedar Rapids, Iowa organized by the Teamsters and focusing on workers? rights. The Guardian and The Storm Lake Times were media partners of the event.



  • Whistleblower goes public after leaked documents reveal China's crackdown on ...
    December 8, 2019, 6:53 am

    A Uighur woman living in the Netherlands has gone public about helping to leak secret Chinese government documents regarding human rights abuses in China?s Xinjiang province because of fears for her safety. Asiye Abdulaheb told Dutch newspaper De Volkskrant that she was involved in last month?s leak of papers to the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ), which highlighted the Chinese government's crackdown on Muslims in Xinjiang. The reveal, which followed an earlier document leak to the New York Times, showed how the Chinese government has indoctrinated and punished over a million Muslims, mainly members of the Uighur ethnic minority, in internment camps. Ms Abdulaheb, 46, told the New York Times that she went public to dissuade Chinese authorities from harming her, her ex-husband Jasur Abibula and the former couple?s two children. She said that after tweeting an excerpt from the documents in June she received a message on Facebook saying: ?If you don?t stop, you?ll end up cut into pieces in the black trash can in front of your doorway.? Ms Abdulaheb and Mr Abibula are Dutch citizens and have lived in the Netherlands since 2009. Ms Abdulaheb said she had worked in a government office in Xinjiang, and was sent the secret documents electronically by an unnamed source or sources in June. Mr Abibula was convinced by a Xinjiang-based friend to travel to Dubai in September where, according to Ms Abdulaheb, he was met by Chinese security officials. They allegedly questioned him for days and attempted to convince him to help them hack his ex-wife?s computer. ?I thought that this thing has to be made public,? Ms Abdulaheb said. ?The Chinese police would definitely find us. The people in Dubai had told my ex-husband, ?We know about all your matters. We have a lot of people in the Netherlands.?? Beijing dismissed the documents as ?fake news?, claiming that the internment camps were ?re-education centres? built to quell terrorism. On 3 December the US House of Representatives passed the Uighur Act of 2019 bill, which could lead to sanctions on Chinese officials involved in the abuses.



  • 13 Mythical Creatures, Ranked
    December 7, 2019, 5:01 am



  • Former Rep. Katie Hill says the wave of harassment she faced after alleged re...
    December 7, 2019, 3:30 pm

    Former Rep. Katie Hill now says that she has "to keep going forward, and be part of the fight to create the change" to protect young women.



FOX 5 San Diego

  • Judge blocks Trump's favorite construction company from building private bord...
    December 6, 2019, 7:16 pm

    A federal judge in McAllen, Texas, has temporarily blocked a plan for a construction firm favored by President Trump to build a privately funded segment of border wall along the banks of the Rio Grande River.



  • Pearl Harbor veteran to be interred on sunken ship
    December 7, 2019, 1:47 pm

    With speeches and salutes, veterans and officials on Saturday commemorated the 78th anniversary of the 1941 sneak attack by Japan on Pearl Harbor, which brought a previously reluctant United States into World War II. A ceremony honoring survivors attended by US Interior Secretary David Bernhardt and Washington's ambassador to South Korea Harry Harris was held within sight of the sunken USS Arizona, which was bombed in the opening moments of the attack that killed more than 2,400 Americans. Later in the day, the remains of Lauren Bruner, who died in September at age 98 and was among the last sailors rescued from the Arizona after it exploded into flames, will be interred in the wreckage.



  • Chuck Todd Laces Into Ted Cruz for Saying Ukraine Meddled in 2016 Election
    December 8, 2019, 8:45 am

    A week after Meet the Press host Chuck Todd accused Sen. John Kennedy (R-LA) of pushing Russian propaganda on Ukraine, the NBC News anchor forcefully confronted GOP Sen. Ted Cruz over the Texas lawmaker?s belief that Ukraine meddled in the 2016 election.With the House of Representatives heading towards an impeachment vote, Cruz argued on Sunday that Democrats haven?t yet proven that the president violated any laws, insisting that Trump was just concerned about ?investigating corruption? when he pressured Ukraine to announce an investigation into former Vice President Joe Biden.?What I don?t understand is why do you believe that if an American is committing corruption we should have a foreign government to announce an investigation,? Todd wondered aloud. ?Is that appropriate or do you go to American authorities???So, I believe any president, any Justice Department has the authority to investigate corruption,? Crus responded. ?In this case, there was serious evidence on the face of corruption. The reason Hunter Biden got that position is because his daddy was vice president.?Fiona Hill Blasts GOP ?Alternate Narrative? on UkraineTodd, meanwhile, pressed forward and asked the conservative senator whether or not he believed that Ukraine meddled in the election?a talking point that has gained more traction among Republicans lately.?I do. And I think there is considerable evidence,? Cruz replied.?You do?? Todd shot back, expressing shock. ?You do?!?Earlier this fall, the intelligence community briefed senators and their aides that Russia has spent the past year attempting to frame Ukraine for Russia?s 2016 election interference. During an impeachment hearing last month, former White House Russia expert Fiona Hill also criticized Republicans for pushing a ?fictional narrative? on Ukraine meddling, adding that it likely came from a Russian disinformation campaign.Todd went on to remind Cruz about the president?s own smear campaign against him during the 2016 GOP presidential primary when they were both fighting for the Republican nomination.?Senator, this sort of strikes me as odd because you went through a primary campaign with this president,? the Meet the Press anchor noted. ?He launched a birtherism campaign against you. He went after your faith; he threatened to quote ?spill the beans? about your wife about something. He pushed a National Enquirer story, which we now know he had a real relationship with the editors.??I appreciate you dragging up all that garbage, that?s very kind of you,? Cruz snarked back.?Let me ask you this,? Todd continued. ?Is it not possible that this president is capable of creating a false narrative about somebody in order to help him politically??Cruz laughed off Todd?s questions, asserting ?that?s not what happened? and that the transcript of Trump?s July phone call with the Ukrainian president shows nothing wrong. He then claimed that while he does believe Russia interfered in the last election he doesn?t think that means Ukraine didn?t.The two would go back-and-forth over the evidence that the Ukraine government interfered in the election, with Cruz pointing to a 2016 op-ed by the Ukrainian ambassador criticizing Trump?s stance on Russian aggression against Ukraine as proof.?That?s the difference? What you are saying?you are saying a pickpocket, which essentially is a Hill op-ed, compared to Bernie Madoff and Vladimir Putin,? Todd snapped back. ?You are trying to equate?make them both seem equal. I don?t understand that.?Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.



  • How the Cool Kids of the Left Turned on Elizabeth Warren
    December 8, 2019, 5:04 am

    The socialists of Jacobin magazine used to treat her like a promising alternative to Bernie Sanders. Now they write as if she?s almost as bad as Joe Biden. What gives?



  • Polyamorous 20-year-old is dating 4 men while pregnant with her first child
    December 7, 2019, 8:18 am

    Tory Ojeda is a 20-year-old woman from Jacksonville, Fla., who is in a polyamorous relationship with four men. She is now expecting her first child with one of her partners. Ojeda told Barcroft Media that while the baby is biologically one of her partner's, the five of them plan on raising the child together as a family.



  • The 2 US Navy sailors being hailed as heroes in the Pensacola shooting were f...
    December 7, 2019, 8:36 pm

    Another victim from a previous shooting in Florida bore some semblance to the reported victims of the recent Naval Air Station shooting.



  • Body of slain doctor returns home to Japan from Afghanistan
    December 8, 2019, 2:26 am

    The body of a Japanese doctor killed in a roadside shooting in Afghanistan arrived back home Sunday, with government officials on hand to lead a brief ceremony of mourning at Tokyo's Narita International Airport. Tetsu Nakamura was killed last week, along with five Afghans who had been traveling with him. Keisuke Suzuki, Japan's state minister of foreign affairs, joined other officials in bowing their heads in prayer after laying flowers by the coffin, draped in white, in a solemn ceremony in honor of Nakamura at the airport.



  • New Jersey journalist re-arrested in Nigeria after brief glimpse of freedom
    December 7, 2019, 1:13 pm

    Omoyele Sowore, imprisoned in his home country of Nigeria since August, has been freed from government custody, but still has to stand trial.



  • TV reporter smacked on bottom during live broadcast: ?You violated, objectifi...
    December 8, 2019, 3:38 am

    A TV reporter said she was left ?violated? and ?embarrassed? after being smacked on the bottom during a live broadcast.Alex Bozarjian, of WSAV News, was reporting roadside from a 10km race in Savannah, Georgia, when a male participant ran up behind and struck her.



  • 5-Year-Old Carried a Toddler Through Minus 31-Degree Weather After Left Alone...
    December 8, 2019, 12:08 pm

    The children, who were dressed just in socks and light clothing, both received cold-related injuries



  • Indian border officials on lookout for fugitive cosmic guru
    December 7, 2019, 3:17 am

    Indian border officials and embassies have issued an alert for a fugitive guru accused of rape, the government said, days after the holy man announced the creation of his own "cosmic" country. Swami Nithyananda -- one of many self-styled Indian "godmen" with thousands of followers and a chequered past -- is wanted by police for alleged rape, sexual abuse, and abduction of children. Earlier this week, he announced online that he has created his own new country -- reportedly off Ecuador's coast -- complete with cabinet, golden passports, and even a department of homeland security.



  • Cory Booker: failure to engage black vote could hand White House to Trump
    December 8, 2019, 9:47 am

    * Democrat speaks to Guardian after Iowa campaign event * Debate needs candidate ?black and brown people can trust? * After Kamala: activists fear Democratic primary whitewash Cory Booker, the New Jersey senator struggling to be the only black candidate on the Democratic debate stage this month, has warned that the party could hand re-election to Donald Trump unless it sends a more positive message to African American voters.Booker has just four days left to meet stringent criteria set by the party for the next televised primary debate, in Los Angeles on 19 December. Should he fail to make the cut, the participants will be exclusively white, with more billionaires on stage than black people.In an interview with the Guardian, Booker said he was ?worried, very worried? that the party was heading towards a repeat of the 2016 election in which Trump snatched an unexpected victory partly because of the softness of the African American vote.About 4.4 million voters who voted for Barack Obama in 2012 stayed home in 2016. More than a third were black.?There would be a President Hillary Clinton right now if the African American turnout had been close to what it had been in 2012,? Booker said. ?That?s how real is the power and influence of the Democratic party?s most loyal voting base.?> We have to make sure there?s a candidate on that stage that black and brown people in this country can trust> > Cory BookerHe added: ?That?s why we have to make sure there?s a candidate on that stage that black and brown people in this country can trust, in whom they see their lived experience.?The issue of the fading diversity in the Democratic race has become a major talking point in the wake of the California senator Kamala Harris dropping out for lack of funds. With Harris out, the spotlight is increasingly falling to Booker. He has been quick to sound the alarm over the consequences of black voters feeling undervalued as election year approaches.Asked what message an all-white stage would send African Americans, he told the Guardian: ?The message is already being sent.?I?ve talked to civil rights leaders, Congressional Black Caucus members, you hear this being talked about now in the black community. People are saying there, ?This can?t be,? especially when there is a candidate out there who is fully qualified under any objective criteria other than the arbitrary polling system.?Booker has met the bar of 200,000 unique donors set by the Democratic National Committee (DNC) but is falling short of attaining 4% in four national or early state polls. Unless he can do that by Thursday he will not have a place at the debate.To rub salt into the wound, Tom Steyer, a billionaire hedge fund manager, has secured a position. Booker said the presence of billionaire candidates in the Democratic race ? Michael Bloomberg is the other ? was an insult to ?voters who wonder how you can have talented, qualified, experienced, proven diverse candidates that aren?t on the stage.?We?ve seen how you gin your poll numbers up by running nonstop ads ? that shouldn?t be the decider of who?s on stage at the debate, it sends a very bad signal.?The Guardian asked Steyer what he thought of the argument that the race was being distorted with billionaires buying prominence while diverse candidates languished.He said: ?I?m concerned about the diversity in the debates, too, and I have asked the DNC to change the criteria of the debates to get more diversity.?> It?s important we have a diverse group of people competing ? and I don?t think it?s fair, but I don?t run the process> > Tom SteyerSteyer has been able to use his personal wealth ? he is worth $1.6bn according to Forbes ? to vastly outspend Booker so far, buying $55m of TV and online ads to Booker?s $3m. The disparity is paradoxical given that one of Steyer?s main political platforms is combatting growing inequality.?A lot of people have complained to the DNC about how this is going,? Steyer said. ?It?s important that we have a diverse group of people competing for the nomination of the Democratic party and I don?t think it?s fair, but I don?t run the process.?The thorny question of billionaires using their financial muscle to wrestle themselves into the Democratic race has welled up again with the late entry of Bloomberg. The former New York mayor is outspending all the top-tier candidates combined, according to the Washington Post.It did not soothe the increasingly fractious mood when Bloomberg commented that Booker was ?well spoken?. He later apologised.Booker carved out his political reputation as mayor of Newark, New Jersey. He has a distinguished resume that includes having been a Rhodes scholar at Oxford, though he has complained that the media rarely point that out, unlike his Democratic rival Pete Buttigieg, also a Rhodes scholar.Booker said he was still confident he would make the debate later this month, joining those who have already been guaranteed a place: Buttigieg, Steyer, Joe Biden, Elizabeth Warren, Bernie Sanders and Amy Klobuchar.The decision of more than a million African American voters to stay home rather than vote in 2016 is widely considered an important factor behind Trump?s shock victory. Trump won the presidency comfortably in the electoral college yet in the key states of Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin he beat Clinton by only 77,000 votes.In the Wisconsin city of Milwaukee alone, Clinton attracted 70,000 fewer black votes than Obama in 2012.Booker said his anxieties about a potential repeat next November did not stop at the White House. He said low African American turnout could also have an effect on senatorial races in North and South Carolina, Georgia and Arizona that would prevent the Democrats taking back the Senate.?I?m very worried about consequences for the US Senate ? it?s not just Donald Trump,? Booker said. ?We cannot win in these very diverse states without not just good turnouts of African Americans ? we need Obama?s record turnouts again.?Booker was speaking at a Democratic presidential forum in Cedar Rapids, Iowa organized by the Teamsters and focusing on workers? rights. The Guardian and The Storm Lake Times were media partners of the event.



  • Whistleblower goes public after leaked documents reveal China's crackdown on ...
    December 8, 2019, 6:53 am

    A Uighur woman living in the Netherlands has gone public about helping to leak secret Chinese government documents regarding human rights abuses in China?s Xinjiang province because of fears for her safety. Asiye Abdulaheb told Dutch newspaper De Volkskrant that she was involved in last month?s leak of papers to the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ), which highlighted the Chinese government's crackdown on Muslims in Xinjiang. The reveal, which followed an earlier document leak to the New York Times, showed how the Chinese government has indoctrinated and punished over a million Muslims, mainly members of the Uighur ethnic minority, in internment camps. Ms Abdulaheb, 46, told the New York Times that she went public to dissuade Chinese authorities from harming her, her ex-husband Jasur Abibula and the former couple?s two children. She said that after tweeting an excerpt from the documents in June she received a message on Facebook saying: ?If you don?t stop, you?ll end up cut into pieces in the black trash can in front of your doorway.? Ms Abdulaheb and Mr Abibula are Dutch citizens and have lived in the Netherlands since 2009. Ms Abdulaheb said she had worked in a government office in Xinjiang, and was sent the secret documents electronically by an unnamed source or sources in June. Mr Abibula was convinced by a Xinjiang-based friend to travel to Dubai in September where, according to Ms Abdulaheb, he was met by Chinese security officials. They allegedly questioned him for days and attempted to convince him to help them hack his ex-wife?s computer. ?I thought that this thing has to be made public,? Ms Abdulaheb said. ?The Chinese police would definitely find us. The people in Dubai had told my ex-husband, ?We know about all your matters. We have a lot of people in the Netherlands.?? Beijing dismissed the documents as ?fake news?, claiming that the internment camps were ?re-education centres? built to quell terrorism. On 3 December the US House of Representatives passed the Uighur Act of 2019 bill, which could lead to sanctions on Chinese officials involved in the abuses.



  • 13 Mythical Creatures, Ranked
    December 7, 2019, 5:01 am



  • Former Rep. Katie Hill says the wave of harassment she faced after alleged re...
    December 7, 2019, 3:30 pm

    Former Rep. Katie Hill now says that she has "to keep going forward, and be part of the fight to create the change" to protect young women.



Channel 8 San Diego

  • Judge blocks Trump's favorite construction company from building private bord...
    December 6, 2019, 7:16 pm

    A federal judge in McAllen, Texas, has temporarily blocked a plan for a construction firm favored by President Trump to build a privately funded segment of border wall along the banks of the Rio Grande River.



  • Military base shooter assailed US as 'nation of evil'
    December 6, 2019, 9:15 pm

    A Saudi military student reportedly condemned America as a "nation of evil" in an online manifesto prior to opening fire Friday at a US naval base, killing three people before being shot dead by police. The shooting, which took place in a classroom building at Naval Air Station Pensacola in Florida, left eight others wounded, including two sheriff's deputies who responded to the attack. Florida Governor Ron DeSantis said the shooter was from Saudi Arabia -- the same nationality as 15 of the 19 men involved in the 9/11 attacks, some of whom attended civilian flight school in Florida.



  • Judiciary Committee releases report on grounds for impeachment
    December 7, 2019, 3:48 am

    The release of the report comes ahead of the second Judiciary Committee impeachment hearing on Monday.



  • TV reporter smacked on bottom during live broadcast: ?You violated, objectifi...
    December 8, 2019, 3:38 am

    A TV reporter said she was left ?violated? and ?embarrassed? after being smacked on the bottom during a live broadcast.Alex Bozarjian, of WSAV News, was reporting roadside from a 10km race in Savannah, Georgia, when a male participant ran up behind and struck her.



  • Flu season arrives early, driven by an unexpected virus
    December 8, 2019, 10:20 am

    The winter flu season is off to its earliest start in more than 15 years. An early wave of illness in the South has begun to spread more broadly, and there?s a chance flu season could peak much earlier than normal, health officials say.



  • 5-Year-Old Carried a Toddler Through Minus 31-Degree Weather After Left Alone...
    December 8, 2019, 12:08 pm

    The children, who were dressed just in socks and light clothing, both received cold-related injuries



  • A Uighur Dutch woman admitted to leaking secret Chinese cables on Muslim oppr...
    December 8, 2019, 8:35 am

    Asiye Abdulaheb told the Dutch De Volkskrant newspaper that she had a role in disseminating the explosive internal documents on Xinjiang.



  • 13 Mythical Creatures, Ranked
    December 7, 2019, 5:01 am



  • Hong Kong protests mark 6-month mark with massive rally
    December 8, 2019, 7:56 am

    Almost hidden among the throngs of demonstrators who marched in Hong Kong on Sunday was one woman who crawled, literally on hands and knees on the rough road surface ? an apt metaphor for the arduous path traveled by Hong Kong's protest movement in the past six months. Dragging bricks and empty soda cans on pieces of string behind her, the young woman elicited shouts of encouragement from fellow protesters. Chanting ?Fight for freedom? and ?Stand with Hong Kong,? the sea of protesters formed a huge human snake winding for blocks on Hong Kong Island, from the Causeway Bay shopping district to the Central business zone, a distance of more than 2 kilometers (1 1/4 miles).



  • DOJ inspector general, set to release major report on FBI's Russia investigat...
    December 8, 2019, 9:16 am

    Department of Justice Inspector General Michael Horowitz will release his report Monday about the FBI's surveillance of a former Trump campaign aide.



  • Indian border officials on lookout for fugitive cosmic guru
    December 7, 2019, 3:17 am

    Indian border officials and embassies have issued an alert for a fugitive guru accused of rape, the government said, days after the holy man announced the creation of his own "cosmic" country. Swami Nithyananda -- one of many self-styled Indian "godmen" with thousands of followers and a chequered past -- is wanted by police for alleged rape, sexual abuse, and abduction of children. Earlier this week, he announced online that he has created his own new country -- reportedly off Ecuador's coast -- complete with cabinet, golden passports, and even a department of homeland security.



  • Could Mexico's Version of the Marine Corps Crush the Cartels?
    December 7, 2019, 1:00 pm

    Could this work?



  • Democrats Must Not Have an All-White Debate?and the White Candidates Should S...
    December 7, 2019, 3:15 am

    The news that Senator Kamala Harris has dropped out of the race highlights the fact that the Democratic field is growing less diverse with each passing month. It's now reached the point where a field that showed such promising diversity at first has been whittled down essentially to four people with first-tier status, and they're all white. There is diversity within than foursome--a gay man, a Jewish man, a woman. But in a party so dependent on voters of color, this is striking--and not in a good way. Of course, there is nothing wrong with Democrats selecting a white presidential candidate to represent the party. But that should be up to the voters, and not the DNC by means of their debate inclusion practices.Those candidates can, however strike a blow for diversity. They should band together and threaten to boycott the December Democratic debate unless the DNC and media partners agree to not exclude candidates who have shown measurable public support before the voting begins. That includes, at the very least, Cory Booker and Julian Castro, and could also include Andrew Yang and Tulsi Gabbard, who have managed to make the most recent debate stage despite long odds.Although Harris had qualified for the December debate, her exit could create an unacceptable scenario on December 19 when the candidates gather in Los Angeles. Booker and Castro?s exclusion, coupled with the probable exclusion of other candidates of color including Yang and Gabbard, means the December debate could very well include only six candidates, all of them white. (Booker, Castro, Yang, and Gabbard have all hit the fundraising threshold, but not the polling one.)Kamala Harris Quits 2020 Race: ?She Didn?t Know What She Was About?Democrats and the DNC should be asking themselves if they really want to eliminate all the candidates of color before the first states even get to vote. And the leading candidates, all of whom are white, should do something about it.There is precedent for the top-tier candidates banding together to protect the integrity of the debate process. Back in January 2016, NBC News, as a DNC debate sponsor, tried to bar former governor Martin O?Malley from its debate, citing his poor polling numbers compared to Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders. While it was apparent that O?Malley?s campaign was going nowhere, it was obvious to any objective observer that eliminating him was a choice for voters in Iowa and the other primary states to make?not NBC News.On January 8, 2016 shortly after noon, Sanders tweeted that O?Malley should be allowed on the next debate stage. Literally one minute later, the Clinton campaign tweeted out similar support for O?Malley?s inclusion. And a few hours later, DNC Chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz tweeted that the DNC was also demanding that NBC News include O?Malley.This joint public pressure ensured O?Malley?s inclusion. It turned out to be his final debate, but it was the voters, and not outside organizations, who chose O?Malley?s fate.Dear Debate Moderators, You Are Working Up Democrats About the Wrong IssueNow, it is the DNC itself that is the culprit of such unfair practices. The party has established criteria for the December debate, which will mean that Booker and Castro could both be possibly excluded from the stage.Booker and Castro have been able to organically secure more than 200,000 unique donors each, and both have shown measurable poll support, especially with African-Americans and Latinos respectively. Excluding these two candidates of color, who represent crucial aspects of the Democratic base, from debates before Iowa could be a mistake with lasting implications for the party and country.I personally like some of these candidates, such as Booker and Castro, while I am not fond of Gabbard. But whether I like them isn?t the point. It is not my place nor anyone else?s place to deny a candidate an equal opportunity to make their case.Maybe there is an argument to be made for a smaller debate stage at some point, but the DNC has set up criteria that allows a billionaire to buy his spot while excluding serious candidates with a following and something to say.And while we?re on the subject of Tom Steyer, he has spent $47 million of his own money in what amounts to a scam. Since he needs donors only to meet the DNC?s bizarre debate criteria, he has essentially purchased his donor base, through tactics such as selling $1 swag with free shipping?usually items worth far more than $1?that has nothing to do with him or his presidential campaign.Why should he be allowed to ?sell? a button about climate change or opposing Donald Trump for $1 and use that as some kind of indicia of popular support? He has also blanketed early states with enough TV ads and fancy mail to get his name identification up to the point that just enough people might utter it to a pollster because they recognize it.Former Mayor Mike Bloomberg is eschewing debates thus far, but with his $52 billion in net worth it?s not hard to imagine clever ways for him to meet future DNC debate thresholds.A debate stage that lets a white billionaire like Steyer buy his spot but excludes substantive candidates of color like Booker and Castro is neither democratic nor representative of the Democratic Party.As a person of color, I hope the DNC and the frontrunners are listening. It isn?t the DNC?s place to eliminate viable candidates before voters are allowed a say. I hope Biden, Sanders, Warren, and others will step up to tell the DNC that the Democratic Party is stronger when all viable candidates are allowed to be heard.David de la Fuente is a senior political analyst at Third Way.Read more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.



  • Katie Hill: It's Not Over After All
    December 8, 2019, 9:55 am

    I OVERCAME THE DESPERATION I FELT AFTER STEPPING DOWN FROM CONGRESS, AND I'M STILL IN THE FIGHT.On Nov. 6, 2018, I was elected to Congress; at 31, I was one of the youngest women ever elected to the House of Representatives. One year later, I was sitting on a train to New York to meet with my lawyers about suing The Daily Mail for cyber exploitation -- and I was no longer a member of Congress.A few days earlier, on Oct. 31, 2019, I stepped up to the microphone to deliver my final speech on the house floor. It was the first time I had spoken publicly since my relationship with a campaign staffer was exposed, since naked photos of me -- taken without my knowledge and distributed without my consent -- had been posted online, since wild accusations from my estranged husband about a supposed affair with a congressional staffer (which I have repeatedly denied), since I had resigned my hard-fought seat in Congress. I had barely gotten used to giving such speeches. Over the past year I had awkwardly learned, with many fumbles, how to perform the ritual that so many had done before me: formally ask the speaker of the House for recognition, walk to the lectern and smoothly position it to the correct height, adjust the microphone so it isn't blocking your face and look at the clock so the C-Span cameras can see you. Talk slowly and fluidly. Breathe; the pauses you take feel much longer than they are.That day, oddly, I didn't get nervous the way I normally did. I got every part of the routine right. I felt calm and strong as I began to speak, because I had to be. I needed to say something to the countless people who had put their faith in me. I needed to say something to the girls and young women who looked up to me, and also to those who didn't even know my name. I needed to make sure that my horrific experience did not frighten and discourage other women who will dare to take risks, dare to step into this light, dare to be powerful.Many people have nightmares in which they're naked in public, trapped and trying to escape. In the days leading up to my resignation, my life was just like everyone's worst nightmare. Millions of people had seen pictures of me naked. Hundreds of journalists, commentators, politicians and public figures had written or spoken about my "downfall," the "choices" I made, the lessons young people should take from what happened to me, the impact it would have on politics moving forward, the responsibility I bore for all of it.I read those articles with the acute sense that writers and readers alike must think I am already dead. I'm not, though sometimes I've wished to be. More than half of the victims of cyber exploitation (also known as revenge porn) contemplate suicide in the aftermath. Many have attempted, and some tragically have succeeded.After the images came out, as I lay curled up in my bed with my mind in the darkest places it's ever been, countless texts and voice mails came from donors, friends, volunteers and voters sending love. But they couldn't drown out the horrible messages and calls from people who found my phone number on the internet.Though staff members at my (now former) offices got tremendous support, they were also inundated with lewd and threatening messages. When a letter filled with suspicious powder arrived at one of my offices, staffers had to be evacuated. My hometown was filled with people who were worried about me, cared about me and wanted to see me, and yet my mom was followed by people in dark trucks with cameras, my sister's business was trolled and my dad drove around our hometown pulling down huge posters of his baby girl in a Nazi uniform with the text "WifenSwappenSS."Sitting on that train to New York a few days after my resignation had taken effect, reflecting on what my life had become, I realized that it was almost one year to the minute from when I received a voice mail from my predecessor, Steve Knight, to concede -- when I found out I was going to be a congresswoman.I was in the campaign headquarters the morning he called. The team had been working around the clock for months or longer -- some people had been with the campaign for over a year -- as we clawed our way to victory in a race that no one thought we could win. When I announced my candidacy, I was 29 years old, working at a homeless services nonprofit organization and had been driven to run for office because of the results of the 2016 presidential election. I was a complete unknown, a young bisexual woman with no political background or experience, no wealth, no Ivy League degree, trying to flip a district that had been held by Republicans for over two decades.When I finished listening to the voice mail from my opponent, I turned around and told my team. Countless people across the country have witnessed that moment -- Vice captured it as part of a documentary series called "She's Running." Most people on my team cried, but I didn't. I couldn't really tell you how I felt then. Shock isn't quite right -- I had felt like we'd win for a long time -- though it certainly felt surreal.I was aware that my life was about to change substantially, but it had already changed so much that I felt like I was just shifting gears. I was excited. I felt ready for it. I knew I was a leader, that I represented my community, that I reflected the change that the country wanted and needed. I knew that I could be a voice for young people and women and people who had been left out for far too long. That I had to be.Once I got to Washington, I was one of two people elected to represent the freshman class at the leadership table, and once I started sitting in meetings multiple times each week with Speaker Nancy Pelosi and the other most powerful Democrats in the House, I knew I belonged there, too. I didn't feel awkward or unsure. I was completely confident. I felt like my district loved me (and the polling showed it) and I knew I was making a difference to so many people even just by showing them they could have a voice at the highest levels of power.The job was hard -- I made some missteps, there were plenty of things I could have done better, and I had so much to learn. But I was figuring it out fast. I was good at this. My future in Congress was limitless, and that mattered not only to me but to the people who believed in me.My home life was another story. That day on the train to New York was also five months to the day from when I moved out of my house and told my husband, who I had been with since I was 16 years old, that I wanted a divorce. It wasn't the first time I had tried to leave; the last time was less than a month before the election, and when I tried, he made it clear to me that if I left, he would ruin me. I knew he could, so I went back to him and finished the campaign. But, after five months on the job and with the toxicity of our relationship growing worse, I knew I had to finally leave once and for all.In June, my dad came with me to my house. I got my things, moved in with my mom, and didn't look back. The fear that my husband would ruin me hung over me every day. I knew the risk when I left, but I thought I didn't have a choice, and despite the threat, I felt better than I had in years.The day that my communications director ran into my office and showed me the nudes and private text messages that had been published on a right-wing website called Red State, everything came crashing down. I believe my husband is the source of the images. (He has reportedly denied this; his father said in an interview that his son believed he had been hacked. My husband and his lawyer did not respond to requests from the Times for comment.) At first, I was in denial. I couldn't accept that the future I had imagined as a leader in Congress -- the job I loved and knew I was making a difference by being in -- was over.I was thinking about all of this as I went to see my lawyers. Suddenly, the train stopped. We sat there for a long time, wondering what had happened. Then someone announced that a person had jumped in front of the train, and died. My thoughts shifted to the person on the tracks while we waited for the police to investigate and for the coroner to arrive. I knew the despair that can lead someone to that place all too well. I had been there just a week before.People have speculated that Speaker Pelosi or the party leadership asked me to resign because of the photos and the allegations about me. That could not be further from the truth. In fact, one of the most difficult moments during my resignation process was my phone call to the Speaker, a woman I admire more than anyone and who I had come to love. She told me I didn't have to do this, that the country needed me and that she wished I hadn't made this decision, but she respected me and what I felt I needed to do. I told her what I told everyone else when I announced my resignation: that it was the right thing to do.I knew it was the best decision for me, my family, my staff, my colleagues, my community. But that didn't make it any easier, and in the days that followed, I was overwhelmed by everything -- by how many people had seen my naked body, by the comments, the articles, the millions of opinions, the texts, the calls. I would start shaking, crying, throwing up. It was hard to talk to my family because I knew they were going through so much, too. I didn't want to talk to my friends because I was humiliated and didn't want to hear more pity and didn't know what to say. Many of my staff members had been with me for years, and we were, for better or worse, very close; now I feared that they all hated me.I didn't leave my apartment. I felt so alone and didn't know what to do.It was two days after I announced my resignation. I don't even know how I spent the day. I was probably reading articles about myself that I shouldn't have been reading, ignoring more text messages and calls, falling in and out of restless sleep. But when it got dark I drew a bath, lit candles and brought over a bottle of wine.I laid there and thought about what I'd lost. The people on my team and in my life who had been hurt and had done nothing wrong. Everyone I'd let down, everyone who worked for me, who campaigned for me, who believed in me. The future I thought was in store for me that was instantly and irrevocably gone. My own mistakes had led me there, but there were other things at play. And those pictures -- no one should have ever seen them.How could I ever face anyone again knowing what they'd seen? Knowing what they knew?The bath water had gone cold. The wine bottle was empty. Suddenly and with total clarity, I just wanted it all to be over. I got up and looked for the box cutter. I couldn't find it. A part of my brain was saying: "Stop it, this is stupid. You're not going to do it. Go drain the bathtub and get yourself together." But I felt like I was out of my body, like it was moving without me, and I got the paring knife and got back into the cold bath.I stared at the veins in my wrists. They were so thin. They were green in the candlelight. I started tracing them with the edge of the knife, lightly at first, then pushing harder and harder. The knife was duller than I thought. It surprised me how hard I had to push simply to scratch the surface. Fine red lines started to appear, and I knew that if I pushed just a tiny bit harder I would start to bleed. I thought about the people I had already let down so much. What would this do to my parents? To my brother and sister?And then I thought about my supporters. I thought about the high school students who had told me how I inspired them. I thought about the Girl Scouts whose troops I'd visited who told me they wanted to grow up to be like me, and how their parents would explain this to them, and what it would do to them. And I realized I couldn't do it. I ran the campaign knowing it was bigger than me and what I wanted, and it still is. I don't get to quit. I have to keep going forward, and be part of the fight to create the change that those young girls are counting on.The next day, I wrote my final speech. My roommate, Lauren Underwood, the youngest black woman ever elected to Congress and my best friend in Washington, gave me a goodbye party with my freshman colleagues. I spent the evening with history-makers, change-makers, majority-makers, role models and heroes to millions. Some great men, but mostly women. Women who will be remembered forever. But that night, they were just my friends.At the end of the evening, I sat uncomfortably on a bar stool and cried as my friends went around the room and said the nicest things -- things I needed to hear. Each and every one of them told me that I wasn't done. Alex -- "A.O.C.," as people like to call her -- said I was a warrior and always would be.So the next day I put on my battle uniform: a red dress suit that my mom had bought me. I put on my war paint: bright red lipstick. I stepped up to that lectern and told the world that although my time in Congress was over, I wasn't done -- I was just moving to another battlefield. I closed my speech, saying: "We will not stand down. We will not be broken. We will not be silenced. We will rise, and we will make tomorrow better than today. ? I yield the balance of my time for now, but not forever." I meant that not just for myself, but for all of us.I don't know exactly what's ahead for me, and I know there's a lot more pain ahead. But I'm in the fight, and I'm glad it's not all over after all.This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company



  • American soldiers banned from Italian main street after vicious brawl
    December 8, 2019, 9:08 am

    Around 2,000 US Army soldiers have been banned from one of the main streets in the Italian city of Vicenza after a brawl between soldiers and locals. The temporary ban, which affects members of the 173rd Airborne Brigade stationed in the city, involves the quaint via Contra' Pescherie Vecchie, where two young Vicenza men say they were surrounded and beaten by several soldiers after a verbal exchange just outside a popular watering hole for off duty combat paratroopers. ?This is not my face. I was not like this before,? Riccardo Passaro, 21, told La Repubblica from the hospital where he is recovering from reconstructive facial surgery after his jaw was shattered. City authorities are studying CCTV images to identify the culprits of the latest violent episode, which prompted Mayor Francesco Rucco to request special restrictive measures from the base commander. Col. Kenneth Burgess issued a memo warning that personnel caught entering the restricted zone during the 45-day ban faced disciplinary sanctions. ?It is a decree without precedent in Vicenza and for this we thank the American authorities," Mayor Rucco said. The US military presence in Vicenza has been expanding for the last decade, with construction of the large Del Din annex north of the historic Ederle garrison to help lodge US Africa Command and the 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team, which conducts contingency response and NATO ally training in Europe. Vicenza's 113,000 inhabitants now intermingle, mostly peacefully, with more than 12,000 Americans, including military family members and employees of the two bases bookending the city. But an uptick in problems related to heavy drinking, violence and public disorder since the expansion has exasperated locals. In 2014, several rape investigations and a car crash in the city centre involving three pedestrians made headlines. In 2016 and 2017 there were bloody brawls involving injuries and property damage. And in 2018, police intervened 550 times in violent incidents involving Americans, prompting new joint night patrols this year by U.S. military police and Italian Carabinieri.



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